Impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae supplementation on reproductive performance, milk yield in ewes and offspring growth

B. Zaleska, S. Milewski, K. Ząbek

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of supplementing sheep diets with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Inter Yeast® dried brewer's yeast (Leiber GmbH, Bramsche, Germany) or with a Biolex® Beta-S (Leiber GmbH, Bramsche, Germany) extract containing over 70% β -1,3/1,6-D-glucan was investigated. Experiment 1 was carried out with 120 ewes and 190 lambs. The animals were divided into three groups: I - control; II - fed yeast; and III - fed Biolex. The supplements were administered during a 3-week preparation period for tupping and a 70-day lamb-rearing period. The following reproductive parameters were analysed: fertility, prolificacy, lamb rearing and breeding performance, milk yield and lamb growth rate. Experiment 2 was conducted with 120 ewes divided into two groups: I - control and II - fed yeast during a 3-week preparation period. Fertility and prolificacy were analysed. Significant increases in prolificacy were recorded in sheep administered dried brewer's yeast: 28.51% in experiment 1 and 31.33% in experiment 2. Breeding performance was also higher by 35%. Both yeast supplements had a stimulating impact on the milk yield of ewes and the growth rate of their offspring. Milk from the experimental ewes, especially in the group fed Biolex, had a substantially higher content of dry matter, mainly fat. The lambs in this group had the highest body weight at the age of 70 days. Finally, however, the production of livestock per mother was highest in the group fed the supplement with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-83
Number of pages5
JournalArchives Animal Breeding
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

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